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Water supplies
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woodburner



Joined: 06 Apr 2009
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boiling it removes the chlorine.
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Tarrel



Joined: 29 Nov 2011
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Location: Ross-shire, Scotland

PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you boiled it, you wouldn't need the chlorine. Takes energy though.

That's one reason why I go for the "keep it contaminated until you need it" approach. Depending on what you're going to do with it, you can choose the purification method. If cooking with it, ensure it gets boiled and don't bother to filter or chemically treat it. (Useful to roughly filter it for suspended particles, to make it more pleasant, and to reduce risk of physical injury to your insides, however). If I was washing food in it, I'd go for chlorine or filtration. If I was drinking it, where taste is most important, I'd go for Micropur and/or filtration. (Micropur is silver-based - no after taste).
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RenewableCandy



Joined: 12 Sep 2007
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Location: York

PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The rationale behind my question is: a bunch of tablets is a doomer stash (or part thereof), whereas a bottle of bleach is just there in the house anyway. If there's an extra one, well it'll get used (slowly, round here, because we use eco-type stuff most of the time) in ordinary cleaning eventually.

Does anybody know whether soda crystals (sodium carbonate decahydrate I think: cuts through grease like a chainsaw, but incredibly the stuff's found in sherbert!) can be used for water cleaning? We use it for cleaning in the food prep area.
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adam2
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Joined: 02 Jul 2007
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Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2013 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A bulk supply of chlorine tablets is indeed a doomer stash or part thereof, but could be useful not just for TEOTWAWKI but also for breakdowns, extreme weather, industrial dispute or other event that interupts the supply of mains water or renders it unfit for consumption.

They are very easy to use, no measuring drops of bleach and wondering if you got it right or not.

Washing soda does not kill germs unless used in such a high concentration that it renders the water undrinkable.

I keep a supply of fizzy mineral water in glass 1L bottles for emergencies, when this has been consumed the bottles may be reused for chlorinating suspect water.
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adam2
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Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It might be worth reviewing water supply arrangements in view of the ongoing water supply problems in Northern Ireland.
Many thousands are lacking mains water due to an industrial dispute.
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woodburner



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 6:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another filter. The advertising looks impressive. Doesn't filter as much water as the Swayer Mini, but it does appear to deal with chemical contamination, or does it?

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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

woodburner wrote:
Another filter. The advertising looks impressive. Doesn't filter as much water as the Swayer Mini, but it does appear to deal with chemical contamination, or does it?

Product details


It looks good for an emergency, simple in operation and maintenance.
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cubes



Joined: 10 Jun 2008
Posts: 618
Location: Norfolk

PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shouldn't it be possible to get activated charcoal and make your own reasonable chemical filter? I'm extremely novice wrt water filtering though so please correct me if I'm wrong.
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woodburner



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PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2017 12:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Activated charcoal filters are AFAIK are not suitable for filtering bacteria, nor will they remove many chemical contaminants of water such as fluoride or arsenic.

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Mr. Fox



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
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Location: In the Dark - looking for my socks

PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2017 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many years ago, I came across a nifty, cheap and simple design for trapping the sediment in roof-harvested water, made from standard waste pipe and fittings:



The idea is that when the rain starts, the initial water washes all the muck off the roof... this falls into the vertical pipe, which fills up with the grotty water. By the time it's full, most of the muck is off the roof, so further water heads off to the tank.

The small hole allows the vertical pipe to empty once the rain stops ('resetting' the system) and the removable cap allows the sediment to be emptied when required.

I have another similar design for trapping grease/oils in waste water (before it goes to a veg patch, etc) if anyone wants it (not so useful in the Northern Europe, tho...) Smile
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woodburner



Joined: 06 Apr 2009
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2017 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a neat first flush gadget, but there is often only small amounts of rainfall, barely enough to fill the trap.

I'd be interested in the oil trap.
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woodburner



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PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 1:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What about these?
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 2:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would trust rain water more than ground water in the area where we are unless there had been a nuclear accident somewhere. If you're lucky enough to have spring water from a deep source locally that would obviously be a better source to use. But rain water put through a carbon filter, and it is easy enough to produce charcoal on a scale big enpough to supply your dinking water, would be many people's safest bet.

The unit referred to above isn't a prepper's tool as it requires mains electricity to power it. I would want something that I could put on the top of my wood stove or even a camp fire.
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