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rash decisions/ thermal underwear
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 10408
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agree, LJ. I've always found that the best way of keeping my feet warm is to keep my legs warm. It doesn't matter how thick your socks are if your trousers are thin. I've started wearing padded work trousers now. Just sitting around in the evening without the fire going is more comfortable.

We had friends around on Friday night and got the underfloor heating and the wood burner going and the house has been toasty ever since.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 4720
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Little John wrote:
Pedalling in the cold does not necessarily keep hands warm because, in cold weather, the body tends to conserve heat-producing capacity for the main organs by minimising what goes to the extremities. Cold hands don't kill. Cold organs do. It's different if one is engaging in a physical activity that involves vigorous use of the hands. This indeed will tend to keep them warm. But cycling, by definition, does not involve much vigorous exercise of the hands. This means, counter-intuitively, one of the best ways to keep one's hands warm when cycling (in addition to wearing gloves), is to make sure one's main torso is well insulated. This, in turn, will inhibit one's body from enacting its safety mechanism of re-directing all heat away from the hands and to the organs.

Ahh! yes the old "If your feet are cold put a hat on" Advice from your Grandma. And good advice it is.
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
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Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2016 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, thumbs are the hardest to keep warm on a bike. Mittens are great for the fingers but not the thumbs - I move my thumbs into the finger parts of mittens when cycling. Awkward for gear changes but doesn't affect braking.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2016 4:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

emordnilap wrote:
Yes, thumbs are the hardest to keep warm on a bike. Mittens are great for the fingers but not the thumbs - I move my thumbs into the finger parts of mittens when cycling. Awkward for gear changes but doesn't affect braking.

I'm surprised that at normal UK winter temperatures a good set of gloves will not suffice for riding a bike at normal cycle speeds. The snow sleds here are driven at speeds anywhere from ten to sixty mph and temps that can reach down to -40F. The wind chill is extreme and the clothing used is state of the art. And of course the riders are not exerting themselves beyond what it takes to hang on with many senor citizens enjoying riding miles each winter at a pretty good clip if not up to the reckless speeds of the young bucks.
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cubes



Joined: 10 Jun 2008
Posts: 616
Location: Norfolk

PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 2016 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From experience a normal set of decent (and waterproof) gloves will be fine in all but the worst the uk has to offer. You can get glove liners to put on underneath normal gloves too if it gets cold enough.
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