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Stock up on bedsheets, bathtowels etc.
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adam2
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Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 3:35 pm    Post subject: Stock up on bedsheets, bathtowels etc. Reply with quote

These articles are generally made from cotton which has recently substantialy increased in price, therefore retail price increases appear likely.
VAT will also be increasing soon.
Inferior bedding etc contains polyester, which is of course oil derived and therefore also likely to increase in price.
Cotton though in theory a natural renewable material, is in practice grown with a lot of oil derived agro-chemicals, and a lot of oil-pumped irrigation water.

It would appear sensible to stock up on goods made from cotton or polyester, including bedlinen, towels, bathrobes, underwear, shirts, nightwear etc.

It is certainly worth bulk buying if suppliers have special offers on.
Fleabay and markets can be cheap, but sometimes of doubtfull qaulity.

Laundered ex-hotel bedlinen can be purchased very cheaply from a shop in the Brick Lane market, London.
The shop is situated about half way along SCLATER STREET, Bethnal Green, and is open from about 09-00 until about 14-00 Sundays only.
Prices vary but bedsheets and towels are often about 2 to 4, bathrobes 4, pillowcases 50p.
Also a vast choice of workwear and overalls.
They sometimes have good wool blankets, but not allways.

I have no connection with the above, but would recomend them to anyone in or visiting London and wishing to stock up on a budget.

EDIT, some years after the original post, the shop is still there and sells a range of laundered ex-hotel linens, but prices have increased since I originaly posted. Still worth a visit IMHO if in the area

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Last edited by adam2 on Wed Nov 20, 2013 5:54 pm; edited 1 time in total
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featherstick



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TK Maxx usually have a good selection of good quality bedlinen at reasonable prices too, if there is one handy to you.
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clv101
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 1:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a good point. Clothes, shoes etc are probably about as cheap as they've ever been and ever will be.

Raw material prices are increasing, developing world labour rates are increasing and Sterling's exchange rate is unlikely to improve in the foreseeable future.

If you have the storage space, I think buying a decade's supply of clothes, shoes, towels, bedding etc is no bad thing.

Anyone know a good place on-line for buying bedding?
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adam2
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that sales or promotions in shops might be a better bet than on line for bedding, which is heavy and/or bulky for home delivery.


Sheets and large bath towels are arguably the most important items since pillowcases are easily made from the good parts of worn out sheets, and small hand towels easily made from the good parts of worn out large ones.

All cotton sheets are considered to be the most comfortable, though the fake ones have the advantage of durability, get some of each.

Proper wool blankets tend to be very expensive, though the fake ones are sold everywhere at low prices.

Wool blankets can be found on fleabay, I would thoroughly launder any such !
Wool government surplus blankets are cheap but much less readily available than in years gone by.
I am still useing government surplus blankets purchased in 1980.
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woodpecker



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PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can highly recommend the John Lewis own brand towel range (their standard range, used to be called Jonelle and maybe still is). Some of the colours do get remaindered in the sales every year, so you only really need to pay full price is you're fussy about the colours you buy.

Last year I finally threw out the first Jonelle towel I bought (in the late 70s) and it still hadn't worn out. Since then I've bought 6 or 7 more and they're all doing fine. They never seem to snag, the ends never fray or undo, they're just amazingly robust.

In the 90s I bought a couple of towels from AN Other department store in another country for about the same price, and within a year they were already looking snagged and raggy.
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Catweazle



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 12:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

woodpecker wrote:
I can highly recommend the John Lewis own brand towel range (their standard range, used to be called Jonelle and maybe still is). Some of the colours do get remaindered in the sales every year, so you only really need to pay full price is you're fussy about the colours you buy.

Last year I finally threw out the first Jonelle towel I bought (in the late 70s) and it still hadn't worn out. Since then I've bought 6 or 7 more and they're all doing fine. They never seem to snag, the ends never fray or undo, they're just amazingly robust.

In the 90s I bought a couple of towels from AN Other department store in another country for about the same price, and within a year they were already looking snagged and raggy.


Now there's a frood who really knows where his towel is.
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woodpecker



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laughing

I do appreciate a product that uses good materials, that's well designed with some thought to the user, that's well made, and that lasts. You can apply that to any sphere really.
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the_lyniezian



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Might now be the time to mention my aunts having an old sheet with a utility mark on it- presumably kept since the war or just after it?

Possible moral: I'm sure simply having good quality stuff which can wear well is just as good, if not more, worthwhile than stocking up on inferior product.

Caveat: whether the sheet was ever used much is another matter...
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Vortex



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

woodpecker wrote:
Laughing

I do appreciate a product that uses good materials, that's well designed with some thought to the user, that's well made, and that lasts. You can apply that to any sphere really.

So in 2010 that gives us ... err ... umm ....
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lulubel



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

clv101 wrote:
If you have the storage space, I think buying a decade's supply of clothes, shoes, towels, bedding etc is no bad thing.


A decade's supply? I expect the clothes and shoes in my wardrobe to last a decade.

I had a conversation with my partner about that recently, when she commented that her 3-year old Ugg boots had lasted really well. I said, "When they're 10 years old and still in that condition, you can say they've lasted really well."

woodpecker wrote:
Last year I finally threw out the first Jonelle towel I bought (in the late 70s) and it still hadn't worn out. Since then I've bought 6 or 7 more and they're all doing fine. They never seem to snag, the ends never fray or undo, they're just amazingly robust.


My "personal towel set" was bought from M&S about 20 years ago, and they're still going strong. They're got a few claw catches in them from where the cats used to balance on them when they were hung on the bannisters to dry, but other than that they're still going strong. I wouldn't be surprised if there's another 20 years of life in them yet.

adam2 wrote:
Wool blankets can be found on fleabay, I would thoroughly launder any such !
Wool government surplus blankets are cheap but much less readily available than in years gone by.


If you're looking for warm blankets, you can't beat the packing blankets that are made from recycled woollen goods. We've used them for all sorts of things, including rolled up in a fabric tube as draught excluders. They don't look pretty, but that isn't your first priority if you're cold. The cats always search them out and sleep on them, which is a good enough recommendation for me. Cats always know the warmest place to sleep!
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Andy Hunt



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Catweazle wrote:
woodpecker wrote:
I can highly recommend the John Lewis own brand towel range (their standard range, used to be called Jonelle and maybe still is). Some of the colours do get remaindered in the sales every year, so you only really need to pay full price is you're fussy about the colours you buy.

Last year I finally threw out the first Jonelle towel I bought (in the late 70s) and it still hadn't worn out. Since then I've bought 6 or 7 more and they're all doing fine. They never seem to snag, the ends never fray or undo, they're just amazingly robust.

In the 90s I bought a couple of towels from AN Other department store in another country for about the same price, and within a year they were already looking snagged and raggy.


Now there's a frood who really knows where his towel is.


Laughing
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clv101
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

lulubel wrote:
clv101 wrote:
If you have the storage space, I think buying a decade's supply of clothes, shoes, towels, bedding etc is no bad thing.


A decade's supply? I expect the clothes and shoes in my wardrobe to last a decade.


I mean all the stuff you might otherwise expect to buy over the coming decade - buy now and store rather than expect to buy in 2014 or 2016.
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lulubel



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PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

clv101 wrote:
lulubel wrote:
clv101 wrote:
If you have the storage space, I think buying a decade's supply of clothes, shoes, towels, bedding etc is no bad thing.


A decade's supply? I expect the clothes and shoes in my wardrobe to last a decade.


I mean all the stuff you might otherwise expect to buy over the coming decade - buy now and store rather than expect to buy in 2014 or 2016.


I did know what you meant - kind of. It just shocks me that clothes, shoes, bedding, etc are expected to have such a short life now. My partner's been nagging me for the last couple of years to replace our 2 sets of bedlinen that are now 8 years old because they're faded and she's "bored" with them. I did give in and buy a couple of new sets recently, because I figure you can never have too many spare sets.

We also had a conversation the other night, when we were watching the turn back time programme set in the WW2. I can't remember how it started, but I commented on the way people throw away clothes now because they've gone out of fashion, even though there's plenty of life left in them. My partner said, "We do that," to which I responded, "I don't," and she had to think about it for a while before she realised that I don't.

Mum went back to work shortly after I was born, and I spent most of the first 5 years of my life with grandparents who had lived through the war. I know I drive my partner mad when I tell her to handle the crockery and glasses carefully, and ask if it's really necessary to throw something away, but it's so deeply ingrained in me that you LOOK AFTER THINGS and NEVER THROW ANYTHING AWAY if there's a chance you might use it. I'm sat here now in a hoodie she bought from Primark (not known for durability) about 5 years ago, that I rescued when she was going to get rid of it, and I'll probably get another 5 years out of it yet!
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nexus



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PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the duvet covers that we use was bought for me as a present in 1988 from John Lewis - it's still fine, slightly faded but great design and no holes.
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featherstick



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PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nexus wrote:
One of the duvet covers that we use was bought for me as a present in 1988 from John Lewis - it's still fine, slightly faded but great design and no holes.


Oh, too bad, it's 2 years out of fashion again. You should throw that out...
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