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SAIL AWAY ON $20K TO $30K: PART 1

 
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Lord Beria3



Joined: 25 Feb 2009
Posts: 4449
Location: Moscow Russia

PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 10:51 pm    Post subject: SAIL AWAY ON $20K TO $30K: PART 1 Reply with quote

http://www.collapsenet.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=364:sail-away-on-$20k-to-$30k-part-1-15-november-2010&Itemid=130

Quote:
“Roads? Where we’re going, we don’t need roads.”

-Doc, Back To The Future

“Get out of the road, you dumb motherf****r!”

-Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse 5

November 15, 2010 - Whether dreaming of a better future or dreading the growing uncertainty around us, we’ve all romanticized sailing off to a new beginning. Though no one knows for certain what the next few years will hold, it certainly won’t be pretty… for most.

With the economy in tatters and countless people forced to liquidate assets, sailboats are more affordable than ever before. There’s never been a better time to chase the dream or flee from dread.

A whole world of opportunity awaits beyond the dying paradigm of infinite growth economics. A mid-sized sailboat can be a self-sustaining, income generating, defendable and mobile home at a time when the brunt of the humanity suffers the very rude awakening of Post Peak Oil life (and death).

A few years back I bought a small but “seaworthy” sailboat for US $5300 and set off on a two-year sailing adventure. I named my 27 foot, 1973 Catalina sailing “yacht” SIN FIN which is Spanish for Without End.

I found the boat in Portland, Oregon and spent a summer living aboard near Hood River while preparing for the trip. That fall a buddy and I sailed out the Columbia River and “hung a louie” at the Pacific Ocean. Two exciting months later we were rounding the southern tip of Baja California.

I spent the next year exploring the coastline of Central America, making it about 1/3 of the way down the remote and disconcerting Pacific Coast of Colombia before returning to the friendly and gorgeous waters of Panama. A few surf-filled months later I sold the boat in Nicaragua and flew back home to Wyoming.

My long-term goal when I began the voyage was reaching the unpopulated fjords of Patagonian Chile. At the time, I felt compelled to leave the US behind and settle in one of the most remote and beautiful parts of the planet. I was painfully aware of Peak Oil and the overall “Twilight of American Culture”. I felt very alone in this awareness. My gut told me to get lost or at least have a good time trying. Once reaching Patagonia, I planned to post up at a river mouth in a seldom visited bay, build a little cabin, plant a little garden, and live almost entirely off the Land and Sea.

Though I didn’t make my final destination, the trip brought me deeper understanding and a bit more peace of mind. Though often stressful and occasionally terrifying, the whole experience proved amazingly educational.

I grew up sailing a variety of small boats at a summer camp in Northern Minnesota, but ocean sailing was almost entirely new to me. As such, the lessons I learned are fresh in my mind and ripe for the picking.

I’m sharing what I learned throughout that trip in hopes of empowering others to consider an affordable, sustainable, and mobile life at sea. Competent sailors own their home and can take anywhere in the world if need be. If we witness an ugly societal collapse, sailors have the luxury of packing up considerable supplies and sailing off to remote environments… like Fiji.

In a less apocalyptic Post Peak Oil world, knowledgeable sailors (and their communities) are poised to benefit from fishing, trade, and transportation. Looking to the near future, I can envision independent sailors throughout the world helping lead humanity towards true sustainability.

A FEW EMPOWERING WORDS TO GET US STARTED

* Most boats rarely leave the dock, and when they do it’s usually in perfect weather. As such, many 30-40 year old boats are still relatively new but very affordable. Some boats that look like Hell can be revitalized with a little elbow grease and minimal expense.

*Currently, most sailboats serve as floating cocktail lounges for aging, out-of-shape alcoholics. If aging, out-of-shape alcoholics can maintain and handle a sailboat, so can you! Trust in your ability to learn and problem solve. Try to be prepared, but don’t stress over problems until they arise.

*All the different systems on a sailboat (electrical, mechanical, motorized, etc.) can be frustrating but don’t let that overwhelm you. Organize and simplify your boat for minimal headaches. Also, there are countless great books on boat repair… and it’s not rocket science.

*Above all else, respect the sea but do not fear it. Remember: deep, open water is a boat’s best friend. It’sland (and other solid objects) that you’ve gotta watch out for!

I’ll write a series of articles covering these topics. Check back in a few days for PART 2: Buying An Affordable Sailboat


The idea of having a sailboat and avoiding the mess down the road on the mainland is a hugely appealing one, I'm not sure how realistic it is though.
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woodburner



Joined: 06 Apr 2009
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 11:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For most people (including me), totally unrealistic. A boat in water needs lots of maintenance. The people on board need a lot of knowledge. You have to get food and fresh water from somewhere. The list goes on...........
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UndercoverElephant



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One word: pirates.
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JohnB



Joined: 22 May 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 12:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was considering buying a narrowboat. Outrunning pirates at 4mph on the Kennet & Avon would have been pretty exciting Laughing.
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UndercoverElephant



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
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Location: south east England

PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JohnB wrote:
I was considering buying a narrowboat. Outrunning pirates at 4mph on the Kennet & Avon would have been pretty exciting Laughing.


I can't imagine a serious security problem on the K&A. The route into Birmingham from the north is another story. Not the sort of place you want your gearbox to fail at 6pm...
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jonny2mad



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PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 2:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My plan when Ive cleared up my affairs may well be sailing off, pirates are a problem .

Your options may be illegally arming your ship or being killed or captured by pirates , in a situation of collapse you might be wise to illegally arm your ship .

Being at sea may be safer than being on land in a period of complete collapse
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Eternal Sunshine



Joined: 08 Aug 2007
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Location: Preston, Lancashire

PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 3:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only if you had rather a lot of stuff on your boat. Going to port to get supplies may be a bit traumatic in a total collapse situation.. Shocked
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jonny2mad



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 4:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shocked Shocked Shocked well you could turn pirate or viking raider Shocked Shocked Shocked
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lurker



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PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



I don't think you would last long unless you were part of a pirate fleet or a semi nomadic boat people tribe Cool

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanka_people
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Vortex



Joined: 16 May 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I crewed a large ketch once for a couple of weeks in a sailing race.

I discovered that the ocean is NOT your friend.

I found that huge oil tankers coming straight at you in the middle of the night whilst a force 9 or 10 rages is not a fun experience.

Nor was clipping on sail cleats at the end of a 20 foot long bowsprit at night in the same force 9/10. Being dunked for 50% of the time below the cold waves in the darkness with the wind howling and with not much to hold on to was - err - rather 'refreshing'.

Never again.

Boats are for the birds!
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sam_uk



Joined: 20 Oct 2008
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 9:37 pm    Post subject: New sailor Reply with quote

I am a fairly new sailor, I brought a little 22ft yacht earlier in the year.

It's been great fun so far, sure it can be scary, but statistically is not that dangerous.

For me I just really like the sense of freedom of being blown along..

As Vortex has pointed out it's not for everyone, and I guess the very risk adverse might find it too scary to be enjoyable.

The sea is not your friend, but not necessarily an adversary either.
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Vortex



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PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
As Vortex has pointed out it's not for everyone, and I guess the very risk adverse might find it too scary to be enjoyable.
I'm certainly NOT risk adverse. However THAT experience (I left out some other scary bits) was just TOO much!

I've been mountain climbing in ice & snow for a week too .. I completed all the tasks the group undertook .. but never again! People pay good money to freeze their bits off and stare death in the face? Whoa ....

Power flying or high speed cars? Now we are talking! Great fun!
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sam_uk



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PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alright Vortex, fair enough.. I do admit that it can be pretty hairy out there. I have only been out in a 7-8 and even that was an 'experience'.

That said some of us do like it. In terms of a peak oil prep it would not be my main plan, as I anticipate a slow contraction of the economy and grinding poverty rather than actual zombies.

However in a pandemic flu situation, or other event of that kind it is kind of nice to know I have somewhere to go that has;

Approx 3 months food
Approx 3 months fuel for cooking
Solar / Battery/ Led Light system
Communications system
A hand operated reverse osmosis water maker
A very big moat Smile

It costs me about £120 a year to keep the boat on the mooring, plus about £100 a year insurance. I have spent about £1500 on the actual boat so far.

So in the scheme of things not a massive investment (especially if you actually like sailing!)
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