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Any pitfalls in buying a very small woodland ?
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adam2
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Joined: 02 Jul 2007
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Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well for better or worse the deal is now done.
2,000 for the land as originly agreed, and another 1,800 for the newly erected building.
I understand that the erection of this building was notified, and in view of its proximity to the house, the homeowner was asked if they had any objection, they did not.

6 dead or dieing trees have already been cut for firewood.
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snow hope



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
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Location: outside Belfast, N Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well they sure seem to have got a lot for a small outlay! Good luck to them. Smile
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 2:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can't lose at that price. The farmer must be nuts.
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Catweazle



Joined: 17 Feb 2008
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Location: Little England, over the hills

PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 10:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal wrote:
Can't lose at that price. The farmer must be nuts.


Yep. A farmer with all his marbles would have asked 15k and expected to be knocked down to 10k.

Does he have any more land he might like to sell ?
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alternative-energy



Joined: 22 Jan 2006
Posts: 235

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Catweazle wrote:
kenneal wrote:
Can't lose at that price. The farmer must be nuts.


Yep. A farmer with all his marbles would have asked 15k and expected to be knocked down to 10k.

Does he have any more land he might like to sell ?


Agreed
Look at this for a comparison at what other farmers are asking!!! Surely they won't get the asking price!!
http://www.primelocation.com/farms-estates-and-land-for-sale/details/id/TWAJ9846687/?utm_campaign=email-propertyalerts&utm_medium=email&utm_source=propertyalert&ea=1
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adam2
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Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The land is very wet, perhaps more so than I realised.
Still has it uses, but arguably much less desireable than well drained land.

An elderly gent who used to work on the farm described the area as "a sad boggy place, worthless to man or beast"
By no means worthless as a source of firewood, but not much good for anything else.

Alder to be planted as suggested.
Silver birch trees dont look very healthy at all.
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alternative-energy



Joined: 22 Jan 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are also some very fast growing willow cultivars and new plants can easily be grown from cuttings.

http://www.bowhayestrees.co.uk/willow.html
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UndercoverElephant



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
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Location: south east England

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 11:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:

An elderly gent who used to work on the farm described the area as "a sad boggy place, worthless to man or beast"




As already stated, some men and beasts like sad, boggy places...
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kenneal - lagger
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Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2011 4:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

alternative-energy wrote:
Look at this for a comparison at what other farmers are asking!!! Surely they won't get the asking price!!
http://www.primelocation.com/farms-estates-and-land-for-sale/details/id/TWAJ9846687/?utm_campaign=email-propertyalerts&utm_medium=email&utm_source=propertyalert&ea=1


This land has PP for
Quote:
After a recent planning application, the land now benefits from planning consent for a substantial agricultural building of brick and timber construction under a pitched, tiled roof incorporating shower room, wc, kitchen, office and other useful working areas. Together with associated hard standing and construction of access drive.


Which sounds like an agricultural workshop or could be used for a stables so the price is very high
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alternative-energy



Joined: 22 Jan 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2011 7:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:


Which sounds like an agricultural workshop or could be used for a stables so the price is very high


Yes, but the land in question in this thread also has a agricultural building which has already been built. This land is being sold just with permission and it is being marketed at over 18,000 per acre. This is in excess of the anything I have seen in my local area for plots of land this size, even with stables already built.
It also highlights the bargin that adam2's friends have negotiated.
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ujoni08



Joined: 03 Oct 2009
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Location: Stroud Gloucestershire

PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2011 12:21 pm    Post subject: drainage Reply with quote

Does the plot slope at all? Perhaps some sort of drainage could be dug, filled with small rocks, then recovered with soil, to dry out the plot, and make vegetable growing easier?
Jon
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woodburner



Joined: 06 Apr 2009
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2012 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If that's done, then the sentiment stated earlier of saving it from development was a bit insincere. Nowadays there are few wet places for things which require such conditions to live. To drain it would mean one less place.
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adam2
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Present plans do not include drainage, for two reasons, firstly to protect wildlife and secondly fear of causing flooding elswhere since the water would have to go somwhere.
In the summer it was damp, there is now standing water in one small area.
Alder being planted, and dead or dying trees being cut for fire wood.
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eatyourveg



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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alder is totally crap as firewood, but it will grow in those conditions, and surprisingly perhaps so does Ash, which is far from crap as a firewood.
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adam2
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The existing trees are largely silver birch.
They dont look at all healthy, to my inexpert eye, and some are definatly dead.
Dont know if they have been killed by the water, or just old age.
One that was cut for building timber was rotten inside.
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