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Any pitfalls in buying a very small woodland ?
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adam2
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Joined: 02 Jul 2007
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Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal - lagger wrote:
Is there a ditch around or in the woodland, Adam? If so cleaning it out could control the water somewhat, depends on the topography.


There is a ditch which leads to a small pond, but there seems to be no outlet for the pond. The water simply builds up in wet weather and slowly soaks away or evaporates in dry conditions.
I think that the pond is man made with a view to encouraging ducks, though this has not worked.
I see no easy way of draining the land which is probably why it was so cheap.
I find it suprising that the silver birch trees grow so well in such wet conditions. They only grow to a modest size before dying but they are very numerous.
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RenewableCandy



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SRC willow might be a goer then.
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emordnilap



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RenewableCandy wrote:
SRC willow might be a goer then.


Willow does wonderfully in wet ground.

And looks wonderful when the ground floods. Laughing
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Tarrel



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alder is another option for wet ground. Thrives on it.
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woodburner



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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 12:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many trees do well on wet ground. Many woodlands are on high ground as the tops of the hills round East Anglia clay, and flood in the winter and stay wet for quite a while. Ash grows well (the recent governments have sorted this problem by willfully ignoring evidence of ash dieback for the last 20 years, in the hope ash will not grow anywhere).
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:
kenneal - lagger wrote:
Is there a ditch around or in the woodland, Adam? If so cleaning it out could control the water somewhat, depends on the topography.


There is a ditch which leads to a small pond, but there seems to be no outlet for the pond. The water simply builds up in wet weather and slowly soaks away or evaporates in dry conditions.
I think that the pond is man made with a view to encouraging ducks, though this has not worked.
I see no easy way of draining the land which is probably why it was so cheap.
I find it suprising that the silver birch trees grow so well in such wet conditions. They only grow to a modest size before dying but they are very numerous.

When the water gets deep enough it will find it's way to the sea. Any dam that is man made may be blocking it's path but it will flow away if you remove some of the obstruction. It is easy to see which way the water wants to drain on a contour map except in very flat areas. If your ground is so flat it isn't obvious stand on your ponds dam and face the nearest stream or river and that will be the way the water needs and wants to go.
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vtsnowedin



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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you have cedar swamps in the UK?
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biffvernon



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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No.

But at least some beavers have been re-introduced to a small patch of Scotland.
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Tarrel



Joined: 29 Nov 2011
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Location: Ross-shire, Scotland

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

vtsnowedin wrote:
adam2 wrote:
kenneal - lagger wrote:
Is there a ditch around or in the woodland, Adam? If so cleaning it out could control the water somewhat, depends on the topography.


There is a ditch which leads to a small pond, but there seems to be no outlet for the pond. The water simply builds up in wet weather and slowly soaks away or evaporates in dry conditions.
I think that the pond is man made with a view to encouraging ducks, though this has not worked.
I see no easy way of draining the land which is probably why it was so cheap.
I find it suprising that the silver birch trees grow so well in such wet conditions. They only grow to a modest size before dying but they are very numerous.

When the water gets deep enough it will find it's way to the sea. Any dam that is man made may be blocking it's path but it will flow away if you remove some of the obstruction. It is easy to see which way the water wants to drain on a contour map except in very flat areas. If your ground is so flat it isn't obvious stand on your ponds dam and face the nearest stream or river and that will be the way the water needs and wants to go.


Yes, some of the rides in our woodland are waterlogged at the moment, largely due to artificial "dams" at the sides caused by vehicle tracks. I was digging some drainage channels the other day, to allow the water out to the (lower) surrounding ground. It was fascinating to see which way the water went an what appeared to be fairly level ground. It actually gave me a much clearer picture of the lie of the land. Much more so than a map, even the 1:2500 Ordnance Survey one we have.
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 6:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Last time I dug a drainage ditch my downstream neighbour threw a wobbly at me. He wouldn't believe that I had a right to drain my land onto his. Where else was I supposed to drain it? It went into a gully with a stream in it as well so it didn't really effect his land that much at all. He was an old country boy as well!!
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vtsnowedin



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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal - lagger wrote:
Last time I dug a drainage ditch my downstream neighbour threw a wobbly at me. He wouldn't believe that I had a right to drain my land onto his. Where else was I supposed to drain it? It went into a gully with a stream in it as well so it didn't really effect his land that much at all. He was an old country boy as well!!
And if you had dammed it up he would have been miffed that you cut off his supply. You just can't win.!!
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mikepepler
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tarrel wrote:
Yes, some of the rides in our woodland are waterlogged at the moment, largely due to artificial "dams" at the sides caused by vehicle tracks. I was digging some drainage channels the other day, to allow the water out to the (lower) surrounding ground. It was fascinating to see which way the water went an what appeared to be fairly level ground. It actually gave me a much clearer picture of the lie of the land. Much more so than a map, even the 1:2500 Ordnance Survey one we have.

We've been having mud problems too, in areas that have been fine for 5 years... We've just resorted to putting a new culvert in under a track to deal with it...
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adam2
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 02, 2013 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Update, some time on.
During the warm weather the land remained damp, and now after brief but heavy rain it is partly under water again.

About half the silver birch trees have been cut mainly for firewood, and the remaining younger trees seem to be growing well.

The earlier clear cutting of a very narrow strip of woodland near the garden has improved the view and the amount of light reaching the garden.
Growing vegetables has not been very succesful due to the overly damp/wet conditions.
Raised beds to be built in that part of the garden nearest the wood.

The holly is growing well.
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:
........
Growing vegetables has not been very succesful due to the overly damp/wet conditions.
Raised beds to be built in that part of the garden nearest the wood.
..........


Most people have had the opposite problem this summer, far too dry! If the climate changes permanently to dry summers you will be grateful for being in a wet area.
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adam2
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Update time, the woodland remains very damp and at times is underwater. Silver birch grows prolifically but is of very poor quality and seldom fit for anything but firewood.
Feral pigs have suddenly appeared and are causing considerable nuisance and destruction, but are good to eat.
My friends are uncertain whether to try and eliminate the pigs, or merely reduce the population, accept the nuisance and enjoy the pork.

I think that these animals are escaped domestic pigs gone feral and not true wild boar.
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