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Chinese Wheelbarrow
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JohnB



Joined: 22 May 2006
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Location: Beautiful sunny West Wales!

PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2012 5:19 pm    Post subject: Chinese Wheelbarrow Reply with quote

Here's a solution to some of our transport challenges!
http://www.energybulletin.net/stories/2012-01-03/how-downsize-transport-network-chinese-wheelbarrow-0#.TwNPsXlZ0WQ.twitter
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2012 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent. Trust the Chinese to come up with such elegant solutions.

A problem with one-wheeled contrivances is getting the balance right. While good road surfaces exist, the Chinese-style wheelbarrow with a couple of small stabiliser wheels might be an improvement.

Nonetheless, great article.
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biffvernon



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PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2012 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fascinating.

But.

Are we not all familiar with pictures of Chinese workers carrying heavy loads on a yoke on their shoulders? I've long thought that they would have been better off if their use of wheelbarrows had been more widespread. I'd like to know just how representative a picture that article paints of Chinese life.
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DominicJ



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PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2012 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did western Europes Road Network fail to the extent the article implies?

No idea how common they were, but Roman Bridges were still functional in the Peninsula War in the early 1800's.

Interesting article none the less.
All I can think is the Chinese Wheelbarrows high wheel makes it very difficult to load, and limits cargo capacity.

I'd argue its a different tool rather than a better one.
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emordnilap



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PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2012 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orlov has posted an interesting piece here about what's called a 'tadpole' or front-load trike. Some fascinating facts there about peoples' current lifestyle, one which I hope we can learn from.
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JohnB



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PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2012 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

biffvernon wrote:
I'd like to know just how representative a picture that article paints of Chinese life.

DominicJ wrote:
All I can think is the Chinese Wheelbarrows high wheel makes it very difficult to load, and limits cargo capacity.

Does it matter how representative it was, and I'm not suggesting using exact copies, and but maybe there's a good idea there that can be developed.

The idea of taking the load off the the human operator is good, but maybe lowering the centre of gravity would be good, making it easier to load. I wonder how it would work with a bike wheel, rather than having to make one.
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SleeperService



Joined: 02 May 2011
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2012 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JohnB wrote:
biffvernon wrote:
I'd like to know just how representative a picture that article paints of Chinese life.

DominicJ wrote:
All I can think is the Chinese Wheelbarrows high wheel makes it very difficult to load, and limits cargo capacity.

Does it matter how representative it was, and I'm not suggesting using exact copies, and but maybe there's a good idea there that can be developed.

The idea of taking the load off the the human operator is good, but maybe lowering the centre of gravity would be good, making it easier to load. I wonder how it would work with a bike wheel, rather than having to make one.


I'd look at using a 21" spoked wheel from the front of a dirt motorbike. Lowering the loading platform makes sense and should help stability but sacrifices ground clearance. I've saved this thread and may have a go when it's better weather outside Confused
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2012 5:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most of the Chinese barrows have the load platform at the axle level which would make them very stable, with a safety cage over the wheel. If the load platform is at axle level it won't affect the ground clearance that much. Using a 21" wheel, if the ground was rutted enough to require that much clearance it would be very difficult to walk behind it let alone push the barrow.
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the_lyniezian



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm as much interested in the decay of roads post-colapse that the article mentions. What would happen to our present road sysytem if the roads stoped being maintained properly? How soon would they decay?
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RenewableCandy



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aha, now our next-door neighbour was a project manager for that kind o'thing and I was rather shocked by what I heard.

Roads of all sorts generally need "attention" every year although of course they were never designed to take the weight of traffic they now have on them. Those frosty potholes from last winter would rapidly propagate across the whole nearby surface if not repaired pronto.

There's a cctv mast in the junction near us that was installed 3 years ago, in a bed of concrete. A small Birch tree (about 6" hi at the mo) is already growing out of the concrete. There are birches taller than me growing out of concrete foundations near us that have only been derelict 10 years or so.

Basically, the whole landscape below about 500' in this country is constantly trying to be a forest, and we're all busybodying around stopping it from doing so. PO might give the forest a helping hand.
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biffvernon



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that should be at least 500 metres, rather than feet.

Here's a road near Fukushima after just a few months with no traffic. Hasn't had a frosty winter yet. I would guess that after five years much of our road network would be impassable without a machete to hand.


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RenewableCandy



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That Japanese Knotweed's a b***er, isn't it? I jalouse from that pic that you can't even use radiation to kill it Twisted Evil
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emordnilap



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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RenewableCandy wrote:
That Japanese Knotweed's a b***er, isn't it? I jalouse from that pic that you can't even use radiation to kill it Twisted Evil


JK was imported here as an 'ornamental' and is now a serious problem in many areas.

You can eat the roots though!
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the_lyniezian



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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RenewableCandy wrote:
That Japanese Knotweed's a b***er, isn't it? I jalouse from that pic that you can't even use radiation to kill it Twisted Evil


Thing is though, Japanese knotweed isn't half as much a problem in Japan as it is over here, because here are bugs which eat the stuff and keep it in check. One plan to control the stuff over here basically involves releasing said bugs over here (they only eat the knotweed, so they aren't otherwise a threat, IIRC).
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the_lyniezian



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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

biffvernon wrote:
I think that should be at least 500 metres, rather than feet.

Here's a road near Fukushima after just a few months with no traffic. Hasn't had a frosty winter yet. I would guess that after five years much of our road network would be impassable without a machete to hand.



Thing is, if there were people around to at least cut back on it, that weed growth wouldn't be half as bad as in that photo. The road surface that isn't ocovered however still looks reasonably intact.

I assume of course with regards to any would-be 'collapse' the esential problem in maintaining the roads is not having the wherewithal to resurface it- presumably since the stuff they put down is to some extent oil-based, as is the power for the heavy machines used to do it- and not the people, which may not be the case!

One might ask: if there was a lower density of traffic, and much less cheaply and easily available oil around, but people to pull out any weeds/growth every so often, then how long would the roads last?
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