PowerSwitch Main Page
PowerSwitch
The UK's Peak Oil Discussion Forum & Community
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Deep geothermal can provide 20% of UK electricity needs

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PowerSwitch Forum Index -> Geothermal Power and Heat Pumps
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Mark



Joined: 13 Dec 2007
Posts: 883
Location: NW England

PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2012 4:21 pm    Post subject: Deep geothermal can provide 20% of UK electricity needs Reply with quote

http://www.globalskm.com/Knowledge-and-Insights/News/2012/SKM-report-on-Geothermal-Energy-Potential-in-Great-Britain--Northern-Ireland.aspx

According to a new report, deep geothermal resources in the UK could provide renewable electricity equivalent to almost nine nuclear power stations.

The ‘Geothermal Energy Potential - Great Britain and Northern Ireland Report’ was produced by engineering consultants Sinclair Knight Merz in partnership with the Renewable Energy Association. However, the report has strongly criticised the Government stating that it needs to take the potential of geothermal resources "much more seriously" in order to encourage developers.

It says that the Government needs to invest an extra £11m per year to support Renewable Obligations Certificates (ROCs) and £1.3m per year through the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI). However, as part of a recent review of the Renewables Obligation Scheme, the Government are refusing to increase the much needed support for geothermal technology proposing instead to maintain the current level of 2 ROCs/MWh, before cutting the level to 1.9 ROCs in 2015/16, and 1.8 ROCs in 2016/17. These proposals go against industry experts who have warned that the UK will see investment in geothermal power projects go overseas as a result.

Dr Ryan Law, Chair of the Renewable Energy Association’s Deep Geothermal Sector Group, stated, "The new German tariff is €300/MWh - double the UK's. We're not going to see much of a sector in the UK when investors can go abroad ... it leaves the industry in a very difficult position”.

The report identified production hotspots in the Lake District, Scotland, East Yorkshire, Cheshire, Weardale, Worcester, Cornwall, Dorset, Lincolnshire, Hampshire and Northern Ireland. It is estimated that projects could produce 9.5 GW of baseload renewable electricity, equivalent to almost nine nuclear power stations, as well as 100GW of heat. To achieve those figures, the report requests the Government to increase initial development support to 5 ROCs, which is equivalent to the levels in Germany.

Dr Law concluded, "We don't want to be left out of the global industry when we could be at the forefront of this development, given the strength of British engineering skills. I only hope this report encourages the Government to act decisively to realise the tremendous potential of deep geothermal in the UK".
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Little John



Joined: 08 Mar 2008
Posts: 5666
Location: UK

PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2012 4:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Deep geothermal can provide 20% of UK electricity needs Reply with quote

Mark wrote:
http://www.globalskm.com/Knowledge-and-Insights/News/2012/SKM-report-on-Geothermal-Energy-Potential-in-Great-Britain--Northern-Ireland.aspx

According to a new report, deep geothermal resources in the UK could provide renewable electricity equivalent to almost nine nuclear power stations.

The ‘Geothermal Energy Potential - Great Britain and Northern Ireland Report’ was produced by engineering consultants Sinclair Knight Merz in partnership with the Renewable Energy Association. However, the report has strongly criticised the Government stating that it needs to take the potential of geothermal resources "much more seriously" in order to encourage developers.

It says that the Government needs to invest an extra £11m per year to support Renewable Obligations Certificates (ROCs) and £1.3m per year through the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI). However, as part of a recent review of the Renewables Obligation Scheme, the Government are refusing to increase the much needed support for geothermal technology proposing instead to maintain the current level of 2 ROCs/MWh, before cutting the level to 1.9 ROCs in 2015/16, and 1.8 ROCs in 2016/17. These proposals go against industry experts who have warned that the UK will see investment in geothermal power projects go overseas as a result.

Dr Ryan Law, Chair of the Renewable Energy Association’s Deep Geothermal Sector Group, stated, "The new German tariff is €300/MWh - double the UK's. We're not going to see much of a sector in the UK when investors can go abroad ... it leaves the industry in a very difficult position”.

The report identified production hotspots in the Lake District, Scotland, East Yorkshire, Cheshire, Weardale, Worcester, Cornwall, Dorset, Lincolnshire, Hampshire and Northern Ireland. It is estimated that projects could produce 9.5 GW of baseload renewable electricity, equivalent to almost nine nuclear power stations, as well as 100GW of heat. To achieve those figures, the report requests the Government to increase initial development support to 5 ROCs, which is equivalent to the levels in Germany.

Dr Law concluded, "We don't want to be left out of the global industry when we could be at the forefront of this development, given the strength of British engineering skills. I only hope this report encourages the Government to act decisively to realise the tremendous potential of deep geothermal in the UK".
Just thinking out loud here, but won't geothermal energy extraction from the Earth's crust, if done on a seriously global scale, start to have an affect the Earth's process of plate tectonics.

I can understand how the harvesting of geothermal energy that was in the process of escaping out of the crust and into the atmosphere anyway wouldn't cause any problems since such harvesting it is merely diverting it into the atmosphere via the circuitous route of a turbine generator. However, extracting heat that was otherwise circulating/convecting/propagating through the earth’s crust reminds me of that old adage:

"There is no such thing as a free lunch"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger
biffvernon



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
Posts: 18551
Location: Lincolnshire

PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2012 7:07 pm    Post subject: Re: Deep geothermal can provide 20% of UK electricity needs Reply with quote

stevecook172001 wrote:
Just thinking out loud here, but won't geothermal energy extraction from the Earth's crust, if done on a seriously global scale, start to have an affect the Earth's process of plate tectonics.


No.

The energy that drives plate tectonics come from way down, in the core/mantle boundary region, thousands of miles down. Our geothermal energy sourcing takes place in the upper layers of the very thin crust and can only ever be many orders of magnitude less than the energy involved in driving the plates around.

After all, we just want to move a few cars about and warm some homes. Plate tectonics moves mountains.
_________________
http://biffvernon.blogspot.co.uk/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Little John



Joined: 08 Mar 2008
Posts: 5666
Location: UK

PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2012 7:24 pm    Post subject: Re: Deep geothermal can provide 20% of UK electricity needs Reply with quote

biffvernon wrote:
stevecook172001 wrote:
Just thinking out loud here, but won't geothermal energy extraction from the Earth's crust, if done on a seriously global scale, start to have an affect the Earth's process of plate tectonics.


No.

The energy that drives plate tectonics come from way down, in the core/mantle boundary region, thousands of miles down. Our geothermal energy sourcing takes place in the upper layers of the very thin crust and can only ever be many orders of magnitude less than the energy involved in driving the plates around.

After all, we just want to move a few cars about and warm some homes. Plate tectonics moves mountains.
I am aware plate tectonics moves mountains Biffvernon.

I also know that the extraction of single geothermal site is minuscule in the grand scheme of things. I also know that running an individual car, in the grand scheme of things, add little to the total carbon output of industrial civilisation. It's an issue of scale Biffvernon

I was reflecting on the possible effects of this occurring on a global industrial scale.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger
biffvernon



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
Posts: 18551
Location: Lincolnshire

PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2012 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And the answer is still NO.

Humans will never need to move mountains, even slowly.

There's an interesting article in this week's New Scientist about plate tectonics that gives a good handle on the scale of things.

Human total energy consumption rate is, I think, about 15 terawatts. Geothermal energy flux is about 45 terawatts.

The limit to our exploitation of geothermal energy is soon reached as the rocks near the extraction holes cool down so the industry is quickly self limiting. Pedantically, it's wrong to consider geothermal as a renewable energy source - one is just mining the heat contained in the rocks at a location.

There will be exactly zero effect on plate tectonics, a phenomenon operating way deeper than any drill hole will ever reach.
_________________
http://biffvernon.blogspot.co.uk/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PowerSwitch Forum Index -> Geothermal Power and Heat Pumps All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group