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Optimum size for new home
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
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Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ujoni08 wrote:
Thanks, Ken. I do like the look of the Ventive S+. I'd probably choose to have it fitted to the side of the house, as I don't want to interfere with the integrity of the roof, nor with my luvverly loft insulation.

Does anyone know what the price is, fully fitted?


They're absolutely foaming at the mouth in their search for installations so ask them for a price. I would think that they would be very competitive at the moment.
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adam2
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2014 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

UPDATE TIME.
Generaly going well, the PV and wind turbines are working fine, and producing plenty of electricity.
Solid fuel range working well and heating the upstairs as intended.

Poor air qaulity in the bedrooms has been a problem. There is ample fresh air downstairs, and it seems that stale air rises to upstairs and stays there, especialy in bedrooms.
(less of a problem in the bathrooms as these have mechanical extract.)

In mild weather the bedroom windows are normally slightly opened and this works fine, but in cold weather excessive heat loss results.

Raising the floor level, as compared to the previous houses on the site has proved most wise, water levels recently reached about 150mm above the ORIGINAL floor level, but below the present floor level.

No structural damage from the recent severe weather but a window was smashed by wind blown debris.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 4644
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2014 6:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:
UPDATE TIME.
Generaly going well, the PV and wind turbines are working fine, and producing plenty of electricity.
Solid fuel range working well and heating the upstairs as intended.

Poor air qaulity in the bedrooms has been a problem. There is ample fresh air downstairs, and it seems that stale air rises to upstairs and stays there, especialy in bedrooms.
(less of a problem in the bathrooms as these have mechanical extract.)

In mild weather the bedroom windows are normally slightly opened and this works fine, but in cold weather excessive heat loss results.

Raising the floor level, as compared to the previous houses on the site has proved most wise, water levels recently reached about 150mm above the ORIGINAL floor level, but below the present floor level.

No structural damage from the recent severe weather but a window was smashed by wind blown debris.
Good to hear your making good progress. Do you have any cold air returns from the upstairs bedrooms back down to the basement or the floor where the stove is located?Even a 150mm pipe down through a plumbing chase will allow the air to circulate and exit through the stove.
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adam2
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 11, 2014 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:
It is proposed that the ground floor will be about 400mm higher above local ground level than the original dwelling in order to reduce flooding risk.
This will result in rather low ceilings, unless the planners will accept a slightly increased overall height.
.


This has proved to be a wise precaution in view of the recent and ongoing weather.
The water has several times reached a level above the internal floor height of the original houses, but below the level of the new home, thereby avoiding internal flooding.

Unfortunatly the water has now reached such a depth as to enter the house despite the increased height.
Sand bag defences have helped less than expected, no sand bag barrier is truly watertight and a little water is certain to enter. The modest amount of water that gets in is fairly easily removed, but with a solid ground floor the water has to reach about 40mm deep before a pump can remove it.
Therefore given sand bags and a pump, SIGNIFICANT indoor flooding can be avoided, but even 40mm will ruin carpets and may be a health risk.

My suggestion for next time is build water resistant walls each side of the front and back doors, about 1,000mm high. A gap being left in the wall for easy access to the steps to the front door, and the ramp to the back door.
When flooding threatens, these gaps can be closed with sand bags or flood boards thereby keeping out most of the water.
The modest amount of water that will assuredly get in could be easily pumped out, whilst the level remains well below the indoor floor level.

A small flight of stairs would be required for access over the wall during flood conditions.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Tue Feb 11, 2014 10:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:
adam2 wrote:
It is proposed that the ground floor will be about 400mm higher above local ground level than the original dwelling in order to reduce flooding risk.
This will result in rather low ceilings, unless the planners will accept a slightly increased overall height.
.


This has proved to be a wise precaution in view of the recent and ongoing weather.
The water has several times reached a level above the internal floor height of the original houses, but below the level of the new home, thereby avoiding internal flooding.

Unfortunatly the water has now reached such a depth as to enter the house despite the increased height.
Sand bag defences have helped less than expected, no sand bag barrier is truly watertight and a little water is certain to enter. The modest amount of water that gets in is fairly easily removed, but with a solid ground floor the water has to reach about 40mm deep before a pump can remove it.
Therefore given sand bags and a pump, SIGNIFICANT indoor flooding can be avoided, but even 40mm will ruin carpets and may be a health risk.

My suggestion for next time is build water resistant walls each side of the front and back doors, about 1,000mm high. A gap being left in the wall for easy access to the steps to the front door, and the ramp to the back door.
When flooding threatens, these gaps can be closed with sand bags or flood boards thereby keeping out most of the water.
The modest amount of water that will assuredly get in could be easily pumped out, whilst the level remains well below the indoor floor level.

A small flight of stairs would be required for access over the wall during flood conditions.
When pumping out from a cofferdam it is best to have it far enough from the object being protected to allow a sump lower then the critical grade to be dug and to pump from that low point. In the case of a house about one foot outside the exterior walls will allow the leakage through your sandbags to run around the house to the sump which need only discharge over the top of the sand bag dike. This way you can keep the sills and walls dry and avoid water getting into insulation and gypboard thereby avoiding mold issues later.
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 11, 2014 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A ceramic tiled floor on a solid bed would also help with the cleanup rather than fitted carpets. A sump can be left in this floor in an unused corner to facilitate pumping. A ceramic floor is also far more hygienic than carpet everywhere.
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RenewableCandy



Joined: 12 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 11, 2014 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It'd be a bit cold, though. You could use cork tiles or cheap carpet squares on it, perhaps.
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 2:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's what underfloor heating is for.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 5:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RenewableCandy wrote:
It'd be a bit cold, though. You could use cork tiles or cheap carpet squares on it, perhaps.
I've had all the usual floor options over the years. The annoying thing with ceramic tiles is EVERY time you drop a glass or dish on the floor it smashes to flying bits. You wouldn't think you would drop that many but over the life of a (cooking room floor) Wink it gets quite annoying.
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adam2
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Joined: 02 Jul 2007
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Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal - lagger wrote:
A ceramic tiled floor on a solid bed would also help with the cleanup rather than fitted carpets. A sump can be left in this floor in an unused corner to facilitate pumping. A ceramic floor is also far more hygienic than carpet everywhere.


A ceramic tile floor was rejected due to being cold.
A sump was not initialy considered, and cant be readily retrofitted.

After the rainy season the intention is to build small flood defences outside each door. This will give a small area about 450mm below indoor floor level that can be readily pumped clear.
Fitted carpets should then be safe, but just in case wont be replaced. Carpet tiles are cheap, often free, and will be used instead.
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emordnilap



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PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have quarry tiles and I quite like the coolness of them, even when crossing them on a winter's morning. They're easy to keep clean and you can put a small rug where your feet are likely to stay put for some time, such as under an armchair or the table.

It also means a sweeping brush is far easier than a vacuum cleaner.

I choose floorboards for the food preperation area though, because of the breakage problem. That doesn't stop you breaking glasses at the sink though...
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RenewableCandy



Joined: 12 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 10:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have tiles on the floor where the food's made. They do look nice, and are easy to keep clean. We just have to wear fluffy slippers and take things carefully.

If I could put pdfs up here I'd cheerfully launch an essay I wrote at the CAT, about flood resillience. Part of the research was carried out at The King's Arms.
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adam2
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2014 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

UPDATE.

The flooding issue has been dealt with by building walls as proposed, the walls are of concrete block construction, 4 blocks thick at the base and tapering to a single block at the top, so as to resist the water pressure.
A gap is left for access, with sandbags and boards to close the gap in time of flood.
Any water that enters is easy to pump out long before it becomes deep enough to enter the house.

The battery bank which is in the outbuilding has been placed on a plinth in case of future flooding.

Poor air qaulity in the bedrooms is an ongoing problem, the structure seems much more airtight than was expected.
Some form of continous ventilation is being considered.

The PV and wind power has worked perfectly.
The solar hot water disapointed initialy but is fine after improvements.
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SleeperService



Joined: 02 May 2011
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Location: Nottingham UK

PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2014 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the air quality is of concern then would it be possible to have an extractor vent(s) up there connected to a cold feed into the bottom of the house and then circulated by the stove as vtsnowedin suggested?

I think Ken posted about heat pipes rather than electrically powered systems a while back. It the bedroom vent diameter is set right with the upper part of the cold air inlet the down draught should drag everything down, with a good mixing, and then through the stove when lit.

Regarding the access through the dam ensure the seal area is kept clean and square. In Germany they seem to use heavy metal 'boards' with rubber seals to provide flood protection. These are said to allow only a tiny amount of seepage. They are narrow (so not too heavy) and lock together with toggle bolts then to the frame with the same.

I'm glad it all seems to be working itself out.
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2014 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could look at this passive stack system with heat recovery from a new company called Ventive.
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