PowerSwitch Main Page
PowerSwitch
The UK's Peak Oil Discussion Forum & Community
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Is There Scope For Limited Herbicide Use Within Permaculture
Goto page Previous  1, 2
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PowerSwitch Forum Index -> Permaculture
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
peaceful_life



Joined: 21 Sep 2010
Posts: 544

PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2014 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_X-BMbLBozA

Permaculture seed wizard Don Tipping takes us on a 10 minute animated tour of the epic Seven Seeds Farm in the Siskiyou Mountains of Southern Oregon, USA. The farm was designed using Permaculture Principles and Keyline patterning. We follow the water system from top to bottom, and then the amazing downstream effects are revealed. This video was produced by Andrew Millison as part of the course content for his online Permaculture Design Course and Advanced Design Practicum, taught through the Horticulture department at Oregon State University. Please visit pne.oregonstate.edu to register for courses, or www.beaverstatepermaculture.com for more information.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3riW_yiCN5E
Twenty years ago, Stefan Sobkowiak bought a commercial apple orchard with the intention of converting it to an organic orchard. He did just that, but eventually understood the limitations of the organic model originating from monoculture. He then decided to tear out most of the trees and replant in a way that would maximize biodiversity and yield while minimizing the amount of maintenance required. Inspired by permaculture principles, the orchard now counts over 100 cultivars of apples, plus several types of plums, pears, cherries, and countless other fruits and vegetables.

Couple of good short videos.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
Posts: 14526
Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2014 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tarrel wrote:
Good point, but they'd be in tree shelters to protect against deer and voles. One thing I learned on the course is what a pain voles can be. They nibble around the bark at the base of the sapling, effectively ring-barking the tree and killing it.

We have a couple of buzzards that hunt over the woodland and surrounding fields, which I mentioned. The course leader reckoned they would just scratch the surface of the vole population.

Oh, and we do have foxes. I've seen a couple and found some of their cr*p today. I've also seen vole holes.


Heh heh. Trying to beat nature. Good luck. Cool Not being cynical, Tarrel, I do honestly wish you luck, even if I wouldn't go along with everything you do. We have our own journeys to make.
_________________
I experience pleasure and pains, and pursue goals in service of them, so I cannot reasonably deny the right of other sentient agents to do the same - Steven Pinker
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tarrel



Joined: 29 Nov 2011
Posts: 2447
Location: Ross-shire, Scotland

PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2014 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

emordnilap wrote:
Tarrel wrote:
Good point, but they'd be in tree shelters to protect against deer and voles. One thing I learned on the course is what a pain voles can be. They nibble around the bark at the base of the sapling, effectively ring-barking the tree and killing it.

We have a couple of buzzards that hunt over the woodland and surrounding fields, which I mentioned. The course leader reckoned they would just scratch the surface of the vole population.

Oh, and we do have foxes. I've seen a couple and found some of their cr*p today. I've also seen vole holes.


Heh heh. Trying to beat nature. Good luck. Cool Not being cynical, Tarrel, I do honestly wish you luck, even if I wouldn't go along with everything you do. We have our own journeys to make.


Well, yeah, but the point is that what we are starting with is not natural anyway. It's a 25 year old monoculture of non-native species. I'm setting out to - slowly but surely - change that. Don't get me wrong; it's not a wasteland by any means. There's an ecosystem there which is rich in fungi and there's plenty of wildlife. That's why we're not planning to make sweeping, wholesale changes. Just nibble away at the edges if you'll pardon the pun.

Now I could invest in a lot of saplings, stick them in the ground and hope some will survive. Some probably would, and a more diverse woodland would eventually emerge, but it would take a very long time. From my understanding, even permaculture principles take natural processes and accelerate them to form a sustainable productive system.

The other alternative is to accept what is there for what it is, and let it evolve naturally. (A bit like British-Indian cuisine; it's not natural to either culture, but has developed an identity of its own). This doesn't give me the output that I am looking for. There's not enough stuff to eat growing there.

It's a compromise, but I don't think I'm trying to "beat" nature. Maybe collaborate? Smile
_________________
Engage in geo-engineering. Plant a tree today.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
Posts: 14526
Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2014 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tarrel wrote:
It's a compromise, but I don't think I'm trying to "beat" nature. Maybe collaborate? Smile


Aye, that's a good attitude.
_________________
I experience pleasure and pains, and pursue goals in service of them, so I cannot reasonably deny the right of other sentient agents to do the same - Steven Pinker
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
biffvernon



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
Posts: 18541
Location: Lincolnshire

PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2014 1:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RenewableCandy wrote:
At least you don't have to support monsatan: there are generic glyphosates iirc.

Glyphosate kill people as well as plants.
_________________
http://biffvernon.blogspot.co.uk/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Tarrel



Joined: 29 Nov 2011
Posts: 2447
Location: Ross-shire, Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2014 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, we're going the "chicken" route. Mobile coop, 75m electric netting, move into position for ground prep prior to planting. Not sure how many chickens yet.
_________________
Engage in geo-engineering. Plant a tree today.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PowerSwitch Forum Index -> Permaculture All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group