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stored food
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
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Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 5:07 pm    Post subject: stored food Reply with quote

If you're going to store food in case of possible shortage or other emergency, it's sense to take into account your favourite foods, ones that you don't think you'd get tired of.

In my case, it'd be pasta, though couscous comes a close second. Couscous is quicker and easier to prepare but both have the merit of plenty of carbs that can be enhanced with whatever else you have around at the time, even if it's only a few leaves or herbs.

Wholegrain pasta and couscous make the most sense because of the extra taste and nutrients - what about shelf life? Anyone aware of problems with long term (over a year) storage of these items? (I'm aware you should rotate stock during normal times but this is the preps section).

And would be your preference for a single must-have back-up stock?
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extractorfan



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
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Location: Ricky

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dried peas are my main thing, keep for ages and I eat them all the time anyway. Big peas were a staple food of the Britons before the Romans arrived I think. This year I'm growing and hoping to dry and store my own.

Never tried wholegrain couscous, didn't know there was such a thing. I bet I'd like that, not keen on the normal couscous.
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RenewableCandy



Joined: 12 Sep 2007
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Location: York

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We seem to be rice-wallahs at the moment, though I appreciate it's got a dirty great C-footprint and comes from miles away etc.

re. pasta, if climate change makes the UK warmer, we might be able to grow our own Smile
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
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Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

extractorfan wrote:
dried peas are my main thing, keep for ages and I eat them all the time anyway. Big peas were a staple food of the Britons before the Romans arrived I think. This year I'm growing and hoping to dry and store my own.

Never tried wholegrain couscous, didn't know there was such a thing. I bet I'd like that, not keen on the normal couscous.


Dried peas! Can I come and live with you? Laughing I adore them. We can't grow enough peas to satisfy me.

Of all the couscouses () I've tried, this is by far the best, in my most modest opinion. It's just way ahead of the rest, taste- and texture-wise.

It's dearer than your Laldi shite of course but no chemicals and ultra-ethical. It is some time since we could get hold of it in Ireland and it may have changed since. All of Zaytoun's products are getting harder to find due to those bastard US lapdog "neighbours" of theirs. Mad Zaytoun's dates (can't get them now) were simply luscious.
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
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Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RenewableCandy wrote:
We seem to be rice-wallahs at the moment, though I appreciate it's got a dirty great C-footprint and comes from miles away etc.

re. pasta, if climate change makes the UK warmer, we might be able to grow our own Smile


There's a (Swedish?) company making pasta from beans, organic. Honest. And it's really good, it's actually superb, doesn't break up like you think it might and of course sans gluten. Haven't been able to get hold of any in Ireland.
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emordnilap



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Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Found a bit about it. Probably desperate expensive but it shows what can be done.
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featherstick



Joined: 05 Mar 2010
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think if we had staples they would be tins of tomatoes, big bags and lentils and chickpeas, and rice. We've generally got a few big bags in the cupboard and I toy with the idea of mylar-vacuum-sealing a few bags every so often. I have a lot of tins stored but some of the food is frankly inedible - Asda smartprice hotpot - bleah! Keeping it for trade or real dire straits. We are gradually running down our stores prior to re-stocking with things we know we'll eat.
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RenewableCandy



Joined: 12 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We buy tins o'toms in "flats" of 12. We really should buy more...

When I was a kid there existed such a thing as packets of dried onions. It occurs to me that they are a 3rd ingredient (along with the pasta/rice and the toms) to a basic meal to which you could add any passing scraps/herbs as available, and you'd always have something vaguely presentable to eat. Herbs grown on a window-ledge (or nicked from a patch you planted beside a footpath when no-one was looking) would lift it a little further.

Dried food is great, but of course its big drawback is it needs an energy input (as all the poor b***ers at food banks are finding). They are now dishing out things like tuna and sweetcorn in tins, crackers and peanut-butter etc, because that way you get the goodies but there's no need to cook.

It occurs to me that I could learn a lot from volunteering at a food bank.
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extractorfan



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It really doesn't take much energy to cook a few dried peas or
Soak a bit of couscous. In fact I bet you could eat dried peas just after soaking, not tried but wouldn't be surprised.
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fuzzy



Joined: 29 Nov 2013
Posts: 720
Location: The Marches, UK

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the UK it's power cuts, financial crashes, epidemics, and supply chain disruption that are my worries. These could take 6 months of emergency food. I can't really see myself storing enough MRE to last my life like the bunker guys. After 6 months of true anarchy in the UK all bets are off as to the outcome. So couscous - yes, because you could rehydrate and eat without power. Only for years if you have somewhere dry to store. Tins like toms make boring food more varied in winter power cuts. Breakfast cereal could be eaten dry. Tins of fish all types. I could live on sardines, cereal, dandelion leaves, ground elder, cleavers etc. probably healthier than now. If you are on meds consider taking 1/2 dose before a GP check and get the strength cranked up by your doc. You can then take 1/2 dose of the double strength version and start stockpiling. After you have enough, you take the full wack on GP visit day and get the dose reduced back to the correct value. You can get build up several years worth [and save meds cost] over a decade this way. I would stash Olbas, aspirin etc. I have used Olbas 12+ years past it's supposed date and it's no different.

Can you eat soya mince flakes uncooked? I think it's already cooked soya flour, but maybe not?
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For emergencies it doesn't have to be all that fancy. 20 pounds of all wheat flour with some baking powder and baking soda can make a lot of biscuits, pan cakes etc. Ten pounds of rolled oats for breakfast porridge and cookies. Another twenty pounds of pasta of various types then twenty pounds of dried soldier beans, peas or lintels. And of course as much rice in five gallon snapped tight pails as you have space for. If you have that then you won't go hungry and then can add canned stuff to your liking plus what you can forage from garden and woods.
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RenewableCandy



Joined: 12 Sep 2007
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Location: York

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 11:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Soya, in all forms (bar fermented, as in soy sauce) is indigestible by humans. It's probably better to store dried meat, or for veggies, dried pulses.
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Tarrel



Joined: 29 Nov 2011
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Location: Ross-shire, Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RenewableCandy wrote:
We seem to be rice-wallahs at the moment, though I appreciate it's got a dirty great C-footprint and comes from miles away etc.

re. pasta, if climate change makes the UK warmer, we might be able to grow our own Smile


Pearl barley makes a nice alternative, and is local. Excellent in risottos (or should that be "barlottos"?)
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Tarrel



Joined: 29 Nov 2011
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Location: Ross-shire, Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

vtsnowedin wrote:
For emergencies it doesn't have to be all that fancy. 20 pounds of all wheat flour with some baking powder and baking soda can make a lot of biscuits, pan cakes etc. Ten pounds of rolled oats for breakfast porridge and cookies. Another twenty pounds of pasta of various types then twenty pounds of dried soldier beans, peas or lintels. And of course as much rice in five gallon snapped tight pails as you have space for. If you have that then you won't go hungry and then can add canned stuff to your liking plus what you can forage from garden and woods.


Shocked "lintels"? Bit tough on the old teeth there VTS, especially the concrete ones! Or did you mean "lentils"? Very Happy

+1 on the rolled oats. Versatile and nutritious.
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Tarrel



Joined: 29 Nov 2011
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There hasn't been a discussion about this sort of thing on the forum for a while. Has the doomsday clock ticked another minute towards midnight?
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