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Worth storing sweet fizzy drinks ?
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adam2
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:33 pm    Post subject: Worth storing sweet fizzy drinks ? Reply with quote

The excessive consumption of fizzy and sugary drinks is generally accepted as being unwise for reasons of weight gain and dental decay.

I wonder however if a stock of these products might be prudent for emergencies.
They consist largely of water, potentially very valuable if drinking water is unavailable. The price per litre is often lower than bottled water.

The sugar content would provide useful extra calories if food was in short supply.

Carbonated beverages are preferable for long term storage since if it is still fizzy when opened that gives reassurance that the container was pressure tight and the contents therefore not contaminated.

I would prefer cans to plastic bottles as the bottles admit light which may cause spoilage and the plastic may be slightly pervious.
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fuzzy



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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would worry about aspartame [and other additives]. It was never approved for liquids until Don Rumsfeld made a few calls, and is nasty unstable stuff.
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clv101
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aspartame would defeat the object of extra calories. I'd agree with "prudent for emergencies". In some situations I could imagine a can of coke being well received and yes, cans are probably more 'robust' for long term storage.
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Little John



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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

low alcohol content wine or beer.

That's how water was kept reasonably safe to drink for hundreds of years
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 11:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Little John wrote:
low alcohol content wine or beer.

That's how water was kept reasonably safe to drink for hundreds of years

Why would you want to go low alcohol content? The higher the content the better it keeps. You can always mix it with boiled water if you prefer something less stout.
A good wine cellar and the means and knowledge to brew your own beer is a great survivor tactic. Wink
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Little John



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PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 12:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The reason I suggested low alcohol is that if brewed in sufficient quantity, it could provide the sole "water" requirements, thus obviating the need to expend energy boiling other water.

It's basically how people used to store safe drinking "water" in centuries past, at least here in the UK and across Europe.

And yes... I brew my own beer, cider, mead.

I might also, if I was so inclined, do a bit of distilling of moonshine on the side...

I might....

But then, that would be illegal, so obviously I don't do that at all
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vtsnowedin



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PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 2:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Little John wrote:


I might also, if I was so inclined, do a bit of distilling of moonshine on the side...

I might....

But then, that would be illegal, so obviously I don't do that at all
Of course not. Wink Wink
Here in the states they let you make IIRC three gallons a year without a license or tax but exactly where one years three gallons begins and the next three start often gets lost in the fuzzy memory of those that have just consumed three gallons of homemade bourbon. Very Happy
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RenewableCandy



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2017 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sainsbury's and Waitrose's 'cloudy' lemonade is delicious and contains no aspartame.

But of course, here we're into the Elderflower Champagne season. We opened our first bottle today Very Happy
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woodburner



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PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 1:59 am    Post subject: Re: Worth storing sweet fizzy drinks ? Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:
The excessive consumption of fizzy and sugary drinks is generally accepted as being unwise for reasons of weight gain and dental decay.

I wonder however if a stock of these products might be prudent for emergencies.
They consist largely of water, potentially very valuable if drinking water is unavailable. The price per litre is often lower than bottled water.

The sugar content would provide useful extra calories if food was in short supply.

Carbonated beverages are preferable for long term storage since if it is still fizzy when opened that gives reassurance that the container was pressure tight and the contents therefore not contaminated.

I would prefer cans to plastic bottles as the bottles admit light which may cause spoilage and the plastic may be slightly pervious.


Sweet fizzy drinks are absolutely no good at all. They are refined carbohydrate with no nutrition value. If you want to be healthy, it is as well to cut out all carbohydrate intake except for perhaps some fruit in order to get their associated nutrients.

For an explanation you could do worse than this

one explanation of the carb problem is the mechanism appears to be a failure to produce, or store, or release, Phase 1 insulin, but Phase 2 insulin remains intact for a long time. Or if you believe Roger Unger the insulin fails to shut down postprandial glucagon. Either way, glucose spikes after eating too many carbs – where too many is a fraction of what dieticians claim is essential – then the insulin turns up late to the party and stays after all the glucose has gone home, driving BG low and causing a panic reaction where the alpha cells dump a load of glucagon and the rest of the endocrine system joins in, producing cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, neuropeptide Y etc. to get the BG back up, and induce carb cravings. Rinse and repeat.
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In a post oil/industrial era where almost everyone was again working the land to produce enough food some of the 5000 to 6000 calories required by a working male in the northern hemisphere would have to come from carbs: even if just to provide a bit of variety in the diet. They would be unlikely to be refined carbs though. After all, an apple a day keeps the doctor/dentist away and they are very easy to grow with little labour required. Goes for nearly all top and bush fruit too.
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Little John



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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My entire allotment is a fruit orchard and apiary for that very reason
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fuzzy



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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We freeze summer fruit to almost last the year. I suspect the UK will go back to the pre modern diet of turnips, dandelions and rabbit/squirrel with the new luxury of potatoes.
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 11:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

fuzzy wrote:
...... I suspect the UK will go back to the pre modern diet of turnips, dandelions and rabbit/squirrel with the new luxury of potatoes.


There would have to be a large die off before the population rebalanced with the amount of forage available to allow that. The Zero Carbon Britain reports do say that we could still support our current population from a slightly reduced area of farm land with a reduction, not cessation, of meat eating. that allows for an increase in the production of biomass for fuel. We would have to make a start on the conversion process soon though and stop the exponential increase in our population as well.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal - lagger wrote:
fuzzy wrote:
...... I suspect the UK will go back to the pre modern diet of turnips, dandelions and rabbit/squirrel with the new luxury of potatoes.


There would have to be a large die off before the population rebalanced with the amount of forage available to allow that. The Zero Carbon Britain reports do say that we could still support our current population from a slightly reduced area of farm land with a reduction, not cessation, of meat eating. that allows for an increase in the production of biomass for fuel. We would have to make a start on the conversion process soon though and stop the exponential increase in our population as well.


Yes. A lot of food can be produced on an area that supports a single cow.
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

An even greater increase can be had by replacing the area used to grow grain for animal feed with an intensively gardened area and relying on, in the case of beef and lamb, meat produced from grass only. Poultry and, to a lesser extent, pork would revert to being luxury meats as the increased cost of grain based feed would bump up their price. Pork would again become a meat produced from grazing/foraging animals with a boost from food waste topped up with a little grain.
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