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Asphalt helps batteries charge more quickly

 
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Mark



Joined: 13 Dec 2007
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Location: NW England

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 1:41 pm    Post subject: Asphalt helps batteries charge more quickly Reply with quote

Asphalt helps batteries charge more quickly:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-41523653

Lithium batteries can be made to charge 10 to 20 times faster by using asphalt, suggests US research. Scientists at Rice University speeded up the charging time by making one component of a battery using carbon derived from the viscous liquid. In tests, batteries made using asphalt charged to full power in minutes, said the researchers. They also found that using asphalt stopped the formation of deposits that can shorten the life of a battery.

Faster fuelling
"The capacity of these batteries is enormous," said Prof James Tour, who heads the lab that developed the batteries. "What is equally remarkable is that we can bring them from zero charge to full charge in five minutes, rather than the typical two hours or more needed with other batteries," he added. To make their batteries, the Rice team used carbon derived from asphalt that was mixed with graphene nanoribbons and then coated with lithium metal. Prof Tour said the manufacturing process behind this new approach was simpler than earlier techniques it had developed for making fast-charging batteries.

The Rice team has put prototype batteries through hundreds of cycles of charging and discharging to ensure the technology is stable. This testing also revealed that the batteries were less likely to suffer the build-up of structures called "lithium dendrites" that can gradually spread through a device limiting its life. Details of the research were revealed in the scientific journal ACS Nano. The Rice group is just one of many developing faster-charging technologies. Earlier this year, battery start-up StoreDot said it would introduce its quick-charging batteries in 2018, although some analysts were sceptical about its claims. Tesla, Qualcomm and many others are also working on ways to speed up charging. Ben Wood from the CCS Insight consultancy expressed some doubts about the Rice research. "We see so many of these claims and I have learned through experience to be extremely cautious about them," he said, adding that physics often got in the way of batteries being charged very swiftly. Also, he added, because people now kept their phones for longer they might not like the idea of technologies that forced them to change their phone earlier than they planned or involved them paying to have the battery swapped. Stuart Miles, founder and head of the Pocket-lint tech news website, was more sanguine about the research. "As our demands on batteries become stronger and stronger, ensuring they can charge faster is at the forefront of everyone's focus," he said. "A lot of what we do with our tech is limited by battery capabilities, but just imagine what could be achieved if we could top up our phones or computers in the same way we top up our cars with fuel."
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adam2
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

An interesting and potentially useful development, but somewhat overhyped as usual.

Current types of lithium battery used in power tools and smartphones charge in less than two hours already.

In the case of larger batteries as used in EVs, the practical limit may be power availability rather than the rate at which the battery can accept a charge.
To charge a 50 KWH EV battery in 5 minutes will require an input of about 500 KW.
Just about doable in a purpose designed location with a large high voltage grid connection and dedicated substation. But in the home or most workplaces, no way.
500 KW is about 2,200 amps at 240 volts single phase or about 730 amps at three phase. Domestic supplies seldom exceed 100 amps single phase.

A service station with say 50* charging places will need a supply of about 20MW, more than is usually supplied at 11KV.

*I have estimated 50 parking spaces, but only 40 of these fast charging at any one time, the other 10 spaces having either completed charging, or being vehicles awaiting charging.

Even the much smaller batteries used in laptop computers could be a problem. A large laptop battery charged in 5 minutes will take a KW or so, fine from a standard 13 amp socket, but not too many at once !
A thick cable and large connector would be needed for a charge current of say 50 amps at 20 volts.

A smartphone battery might need 25 amps at 5 volts, entirely possible but not via a USB connection.
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Potemkin Villager



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PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:
An interesting and potentially useful development, but somewhat overhyped as usual.

Current types of lithium battery used in power tools and smartphones charge in less than two hours already.

In the case of larger batteries as used in EVs, the practical limit may be power availability rather than the rate at which the battery can accept a charge.
To charge a 50 KWH EV battery in 5 minutes will require an input of about 500 KW.
Just about doable in a purpose designed location with a large high voltage grid connection and dedicated substation. But in the home or most workplaces, no way.
500 KW is about 2,200 amps at 240 volts single phase or about 730 amps at three phase. Domestic supplies seldom exceed 100 amps single phase.

A service station with say 50* charging places will need a supply of about 20MW, more than is usually supplied at 11KV.

*I have estimated 50 parking spaces, but only 40 of these fast charging at any one time, the other 10 spaces having either completed charging, or being vehicles awaiting charging.

Even the much smaller batteries used in laptop computers could be a problem. A large laptop battery charged in 5 minutes will take a KW or so, fine from a standard 13 amp socket, but not too many at once !
A thick cable and large connector would be needed for a charge current of say 50 amps at 20 volts.

A smartphone battery might need 25 amps at 5 volts, entirely possible but not via a USB connection.


IMHO the claims made for these superbatteries are pure bollocks. They strangely omit to describe the physical mechanism by which these extraordinarily impressive feats are claimed to be achieved.

Even if it were possible and the issues raised by A2 addressed, I would not care to be near a phone battery charging at these rates and as for an EV battery being supercharged I would want to be miles away at least.
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Mark



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PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EVS30, collocated with BATTERY+STRORAGE and f-cell.......
https://www.messe-stuttgart.de/en/evs30/

All those Germans are wasting their time...?
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Potemkin Villager



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mark wrote:
EVS30, collocated with BATTERY+STRORAGE and f-cell.......
https://www.messe-stuttgart.de/en/evs30/

All those Germans are wasting their time...?


It all depends what they think is achievable and how objectively they report the results of their efforts.

Ludicrous gushing hype such as ".... just imagine what could be achieved if we could top up our phones or computers in the same way we top up our cars with fuel." suggests the product is snake oil.
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Potemkin Villager



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PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It now seems that "instantly" charged batteries are possible!

https://inhabitat.com/instantly-rechargeable-battery-spells-bad-news-for-gas-guzzling-cars/

"Drawing on the Purdue energy storage technology, electric car owners would pull up to a station and fill up their cars with not gas, but fluid electrolytes. The spent battery fluids could be gathered and recharged at a solar or wind farm."

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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Am I being thick or something but if the electrolyte in spent surely that means that the plates are coated with solids and need to be discharged of this material before more fresh electrolyte can be added?

In a flow battery the flow is reversed in charging to put the lumps back into the electrolyte.
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adam2
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that some types of flow battery can be "charged" by simply replacing the spent electrolytes with new. The electrodes being inert means of connection rather than taking part in the chemical reaction.

I still think that the idea is a non-starter though. Too many practical pitfalls.
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