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Another water supply failure, Sussex.

 
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adam2
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Joined: 02 Jul 2007
Posts: 8002
Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2020 1:57 pm    Post subject: Another water supply failure, Sussex. Reply with quote

Blamed on extra demand and a burst pipe.
Significant numbers have been without mains water for some days.

This again shows the importance of being prepared, preferably with bottled drinking water, and a drum or water butt for other uses.

TPTB have provided bottled water collection points. But it would be unwise to rely on such provision in the event of a larger scale problem.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-53748040
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 12150
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2020 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With all the hot, very dry weather that we've had in the south I wouldn't be at all surprised if clay shrinkage and heave was causing a problem with pipes and joints in the water supply. We've got a minor leak near us on a pipe which bursts about once a year because it is old, rusty, under a road and in a clay soil. Luckily we're on the pump side of the cut off point for that section so our water supply is kept on. Also we're a farm with animals so they go to great lengths to keep our water supply going. We don't tell them that the cattle get their water from a stream!
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Last edited by kenneal - lagger on Wed Aug 12, 2020 6:27 pm; edited 1 time in total
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
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Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2020 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We pumped out two 1000 ltr water tanks which catch water off our roofs into other tanks at the top of the vegetable garden last night in anticipation of them being refilled by today's thunderstorms. We've had thunder and lightning all around us but not even enough rain to wet the surface of the patio fully. There's always tomorrow!
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adam2
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Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2020 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since I posted the above, my water pressure has dropped to the extent that it wont work the electric shower, nor reliably work the washing machine.
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BritDownUnder



Joined: 21 Sep 2011
Posts: 751
Location: Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2020 11:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting!.
I can't offer any advice on UK water infrastructure other than to say most has fallen into foreign ownership - partly by Australians in the case of South East Water. Extra demand seems a bit fishy as an explanation.

In Australia new houses must have a 3000 litre tank capturing rainfall and with a pump and three-way diverter can be used to supply some non potable water demands from the house such as toilets and washing clothes. This is supposedly to save water not be an emergency thing.
Most water supply in Australia is owned by local councils. Some councils only undertake to supply water and not necessarily potable water.
I have 7000 litres of storage and it is currently full and used to water the garden. Lasts about 4 weeks of normal irrigation - 100 litres per day.

We had an incident of low water pressure a week ago which made me get another 8 bottles of water for the store.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 6369
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2020 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would guess that the UK has miles of old cast iron water lines that are now over one hundred years old installed with oakum and poured in lead at the joints. Also as frost heaves are seldom a problem in the UK the standard burial depth is shallower then the six feet common in New England. So where a line crosses a road in clay soil the trucks today weighing four times what trucks weighed in 1920 pump the clay and move the pipe up and down stressing the joints to the point of leakage.
The only cure is to dig up and replace with new ductile iron or heavy duty plastic lines buried deeper with a stronger road base constructed over them.You would have to replace about two percent of each system each year to get ahead of the rate of failure you are now enduring.
One option with the HDPE plastic pipe is to directionaly bore the new line below the old and just abandon the old in place. This requires just a pit every 500 to 1000 feet to start and stop pull runs and a six by six pit for each service connection which can also be bored from the street to the building foundation or even through it to the basement. This pipe is more expensive per foot then ductile iron but the cost savings from not disturbing the surface between pits usually outweighs the price difference.
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
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Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2020 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BritDownUnder wrote:
In Australia new houses must have a 3000 litre tank capturing rainfall


That's a great idea and one that will probably have to implemented around the world as humans carry on damaging the climate.

Even in relatively damp Ireland we should do this; we had about 10 weeks of scorching weather earlier this year and our stored rainwater ran out: I think we had at the time 4,500 litres of storage. I've since added another couple of thousand and I have plans for a further 5,000. We do have a lot of stuff growing to be fair.

All new builds should be harvesting rainwater and sunshine. Very Happy
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