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Wild Food
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Default0ptions



Joined: 20 Mar 2020
Posts: 122
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Thu Apr 02, 2020 8:16 pm    Post subject: Wild Food Reply with quote

One for UE perhaps:

Foraging for bulk carbohydrates

Not many that I can think of that don't require too much fiddling about besides burdock root and bulrushes.

Suggestions?
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Little John



Joined: 08 Mar 2008
Posts: 8344
Location: UK

PostPosted: Thu Apr 02, 2020 10:49 pm    Post subject: Re: Wild Food Reply with quote

Default0ptions wrote:
One for UE perhaps:

Foraging for bulk carbohydrates

Not many that I can think of that don't require too much fiddling about besides burdock root and bulrushes.

Suggestions?
Dried pasta and noodles.

Even in the current climate, exceptionally easy to forage, it turns out.

Leave the burdock and bulrushes to the non human critters. We've stolen enough off them already.
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Default0ptions



Joined: 20 Mar 2020
Posts: 122
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Thu Apr 02, 2020 10:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Wild Food Reply with quote

Little John wrote:
Default0ptions wrote:
One for UE perhaps:

Foraging for bulk carbohydrates

Not many that I can think of that don't require too much fiddling about besides burdock root and bulrushes.

Suggestions?
Dried pasta and noodles.

Exceptionally easy to forage, it turns out.

Leave the burdock and bulrushes to the non human critters. We've stolen enough off them already.


And, sadly, now commonly found in the dustbins of those who stripped the shelves in a panic and then threw them out next bin day. I saw a news pic of a bin overflowing with bags of potatoes and tinned food. WTF?
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UndercoverElephant



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
Posts: 11122
Location: south east England

PostPosted: Thu Apr 02, 2020 11:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Wild Food Reply with quote

Default0ption

Quote:
bulrushes.


Reedmace.

https://www.geoffdann.co.uk/reedmace-rhizome-flour/

Quote:

Suggestions?


I presume you mean starch rather than sugar, in which case there aren't any. Reedmace is about as good as it gets.
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Default0ptions



Joined: 20 Mar 2020
Posts: 122
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Thu Apr 02, 2020 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reedmace is what I mean by bulrushes.

There are acorns, sweet chesnuts, hazelnuts (beat the squirrels or eat the squirrels lol) I suppose. Acorns take a fair bit of processing though.
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 12264
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2020 1:27 pm    Post subject: Re: Wild Food Reply with quote

Little John wrote:
Default0ptions wrote:
One for UE perhaps:

Foraging for bulk carbohydrates

Not many that I can think of that don't require too much fiddling about besides burdock root and bulrushes.

Suggestions?
Dried pasta and noodles.

Even in the current climate, exceptionally easy to forage, it turns out.

Leave the burdock and bulrushes to the non human critters. We've stolen enough off them already.


I don't think that we have any non human critters left in this country that eat reedmace and burdock.
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UndercoverElephant



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
Posts: 11122
Location: south east England

PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2020 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Default0ptions wrote:
Reedmace is what I mean by bulrushes.

There are acorns, sweet chesnuts, hazelnuts (beat the squirrels or eat the squirrels lol) I suppose. Acorns take a fair bit of processing though.


Acorns can be de-tannified by leaching. The best way to do this is to put them in a net bag and put the bag in a toilet cistern for a month.

Some Holm Oak acorns don't need processing. They are just as edible as
chestnuts - you can just bung them in the microwave. But this is inconsistent - the same tree can produce both bitter and edible acorns, sometimes simultaneously.

Plenty of chestnuts available in a good year, at least if you are sufficiently far south. In the northern half of the UK, they are usually empty husks.
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 12264
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have a couple of chestnut trees in our south facing fields, planted to a Capability Brown plan, in central southern England and it takes a very good year to get even a small proportion of the chestnuts produced to be large enough to warrant eating.

We have been given five small walnut trees, a couple of years old, so by the time they are fruiting global warming might have kicked in enough to ripen their fruit every year.
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Catweazle



Joined: 17 Feb 2008
Posts: 2551
Location: Little England, over the hills

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 1:28 am    Post subject: Re: Wild Food Reply with quote

Default0ptions wrote:
Little John wrote:
Default0ptions wrote:
One for UE perhaps:

Foraging for bulk carbohydrates

Not many that I can think of that don't require too much fiddling about besides burdock root and bulrushes.

Suggestions?
Dried pasta and noodles.

Exceptionally easy to forage, it turns out.

Leave the burdock and bulrushes to the non human critters. We've stolen enough off them already.


My son told me that the picture was taken 5 years ago, after some students were evicted from somewhere and the house cleared. I haven't checked it out.

And, sadly, now commonly found in the dustbins of those who stripped the shelves in a panic and then threw them out next bin day. I saw a news pic of a bin overflowing with bags of potatoes and tinned food. WTF?
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Default0ptions



Joined: 20 Mar 2020
Posts: 122
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try again Cat - the gremlins robbe1you of that post
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Default0ptions



Joined: 20 Mar 2020
Posts: 122
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 1:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Someone did ask about my edible bamboo somewhere.

I found the label!

Its Phyllostachys Dulcis.

"Sweet edible shoots. Hardy to -25c"

I managed to harvest a few last year before they exponentialed into the stratosphere and I was too late, but the few that I got were tender raw and even better steamed.

I've spotted the first one coming up this year and I'm ready!
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BritDownUnder



Joined: 21 Sep 2011
Posts: 772
Location: Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 3:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Default0ptions wrote:
Someone did ask about my edible bamboo somewhere.

I found the label!

Its Phyllostachys Dulcis.

"Sweet edible shoots. Hardy to -25c"

I managed to harvest a few last year before they exponentialed into the stratosphere and I was too late, but the few that I got were tender raw and even better steamed.

I've spotted the first one coming up this year and I'm ready!


There was a very interesting program on Landline - The Australian Broadcasting Corp Farming program - about a farm growing this bamboo and I thought it was very interesting. I did not realise that this type of bamboo grew in the UK as this farm was in tropical Queensland.
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Default0ptions



Joined: 20 Mar 2020
Posts: 122
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hardy down to -25 c

So it claims on the label
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UndercoverElephant



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
Posts: 11122
Location: south east England

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bamboo is one of the things on my long to-do list. I believe most types of bamboo are edible if you catch them at the right moment, but some will be better than others.
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Default0ptions



Joined: 20 Mar 2020
Posts: 122
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They can be pretty bitter. This one is fine even raw
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