PowerSwitch Main Page
PowerSwitch
The UK's Peak Oil Discussion Forum & Community
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

PO-style gardening

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PowerSwitch Forum Index -> Preparations
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
chris25



Joined: 09 Dec 2007
Posts: 282

PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2008 11:13 am    Post subject: PO-style gardening Reply with quote

Check out this product-

http://www.naturalcollection.com/natural-products/recycledwatersavingporouspipewithfittings.aspx

Lets face it, the days of unlimited tap water may be coming to an end. 2 water butts and 2 X 15m piping could sort the issue.

My idea is that you have two (or more) long lines of vegetable crops which have been sown at different times to ensure you have access to vitamins all year round.

The staple food such as wheat is tolerant to a few dry days. The area surronding the wheat could also have wild rasberries and strawberries plants in it (these may require watering occassionally though), and an area of land just left to its own. Here stinging nettles, dandellions and other edible wild plants may pop up.





Bread would form the basis of your diet. Eggs from chickens would give you omelettes, scrambled eggs, egg and toast and mayo. on a special occasion you could also have the odd chicken and if you buy an air gun you could have the occassional pigeon, rabbit or squirrel!

Herbs would be planted to spice meals up.

Salads and veg could be eaten with every meal.

Soups could be made from nettles, leeks, caroots, parsnips, or tomatoes (in greenhouse)

Haricot beans could be stored all year and mixed with the odd bottled tomato to create home made "baked beans"

Spring rasberries, wild strawberries, apples, wild blackberries and autumn rasberries could give you treats nearly all year round. Any surplus fruits would be turned to fruit sauces or boiled liquids as a winter treat.

Sunflowers would be used to feed chickens (along with surplus wheat) and could be used as cooking oil.

The diet would be a rough one, and you'd eat a lot of the same thing (especially through the winter) but fruit and veg would actually taste of something (especially if you use old varieties). You can forget tesco finest cloted cream buns, a freshly picked rasberry would be the new pleasure and would be like heaven on earth.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
contadino



Joined: 05 Apr 2007
Posts: 1268
Location: Puglia, Italia

PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2008 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use drip irrigation systems extensively. Multiple crops planted on a single pipe isn't a great idea as some mature quicker than others. You're better off with a main (non-porous) pipe with several shorter (porous) ones coming off it. Where the porous pipes meet the larger pipe, you can have taps so that when one row finishes, you just stop water flowing to it. It also allows you to flex your watering schedule (courgettes need water every day, tomatoes only every 3rd day).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kenneal - lagger
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 9740
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 1:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Our rotation is:-

Year 1 - spuds with loads of compost applied.

Year 2 - Broad beans & onions, some autumn planted, some spring.

Year 3 - Runner and french beans, squashes, courgettes and sweet corn (the three sisters of Amerindian culture) and leaks, with lime and more compost.

Year 4 - Brassicas

Year 5 - Roots: carrots, parsnips, sweeds, turnips

We've gone for a 5 course rotation rather than 4 because there is too much in year 2 and 3 to divide our beds up evenly otherwise. There are different types of beans in each year to add fertility as well.

We're adding Rockdust and charcoal to our beds as and when we have it to increase long term futility. We buy in municipal compost 2 tonnes at a time as we are expanding our deep bed system at the moment to cover the whole veggie garden and both polytunnels. We've got over 20 deep beds at 1.2m x 10m.

We alternate tomatoes with cucumbers, peppers and melons in two polytunnels and plant salad crops and spinach where ever we can find a space. We have a herb garden just outside the wearedodgy door.

We water from rainwater butts (9000 litres of IBC containers) using watering cans, drips and the leaky pipes, which Chris flagged up above, where required. The slight problem with them is that if your beds are on a slope, as ours are, they get more water at the bottom of the bed than the top because the water pressure is greater. One polytunnel gets all the grey water from the house but we'll have to alter the system to spread it around both tunnels.

We've got blackcurrants, redcurrants, blackberries, raspberries, gooseberries and blueberries (on the way) and some apple, pear, plum and damson trees. Also wild nettle and fat DODGY by the basket load, dandelion, burdock (the last two for beer soon), elderberry, hawthorn, hazel, chestnut and sloe.

Nearly forgot Jerusalem artichokes and we've played with sweat potatoes and Cape gooseberries in the polytunnel but the weather isn't warm enough yet for sweat potatoes (at least it wasn't last summer).

I've just started a forest garden but it's taking a pasting from deer at the moment; got to deer fence it unfortunately (expensive). Two trees have been trashed and it's started on our runner beans and strawberries in the veggie garden, signing its death warrant; it's going in the freezer as soon as arrangements can be made. A word of warning; don't keep goats unless you have a gaol like structure in which to incarcerate them as they'll trash your food before you can blink.

We store spuds, dried beans, onions, squashes and marrows (overgrown courgettes) in the cellar, over winter, with jams, pickles and jarred tomatoes. Roots, we leave in the ground over winter and pick as required as with leaks and brassicas. We must start some sugar beet to future proof our jam supply.

We don't do wheat at the moment as we get more carbohydrate per sq m from spuds. Might do some wheat and/or spelt in the future, though, if rainfall patterns change drastically, or we can't buy it in, as we've bought a hand mill. Grain keeps its nutrients better for much longer than flour.

We're sort of prepared for a changeover to a more Mediterranean diet when the weather gets warmer but must start thinking about oil production. I do have one very small olive tree that has flowers on it for the first time this year. I should hedge my bets with a few olive trees as well as some sunflowers. If the climate warms significantly though our hazel and chestnuts should produce much larger fruit. It's really noticeable how much bigger they are in a hot year.

We've also got beef on the hoof and lamb and pork in partnership with some friends. We could kill and butcher those at home if TS really HTF, together with the odd deer.

We're also in the process of starting a community garden scheme on at least one local estate to share the goodies around as a protection against robbery in a severely depleted future. We would probably have to come to a deal with the beef as well, meat for security, as the cattle are grazed on a public common much of the time. This represents the culmination of about 30 years of preparation and practice.

Edit - forgot the rhubard.
_________________
BLOG

"When the last tree is cut down, and the last river has been poisoned, and the last fish has been caught, Only then will you find out that you cannot eat money". --The Cree Indians
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Keela



Joined: 05 Sep 2006
Posts: 1941
Location: N.Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 7:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Way to GARDEN Kenneal! Brilliant stuff.

We are working ever upwards in terms of scale and variety. BUT you are right, it takes years to increase productivity!

Great fun though.

We had our first "all home grown" meal of the year recently and that feels just ace. We are still a long way from providing even one meal a day for the family from the garden/farm.

Yet we are on the road towards that goal.

Sally

ps I've been thinking about sugar beet too. I gather it's fairly energy intensive to process.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Andy Hunt



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
Posts: 6760
Location: Bury, Lancashire, UK

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal wrote:
to increase long term futility


Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing

I don't think you really want to be doing that, do you?!!?
_________________
Andy Hunt
http://greencottage.burysolarclub.net
Eternal Sunshine wrote:

I wouldn't want to worry you with the truth. Rolling Eyes
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kenneal - lagger
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 9740
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 11:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're right, Andy. There are enough people doing that already.

Hopefully, most of the food for the Summer Gathering will come from the garden.
_________________
BLOG

"When the last tree is cut down, and the last river has been poisoned, and the last fish has been caught, Only then will you find out that you cannot eat money". --The Cree Indians
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Eternal Sunshine



Joined: 08 Aug 2007
Posts: 776
Location: Preston, Lancashire

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal wrote:
Hopefully, most of the food for the Summer Gathering will come from the garden.


Wow that would be a real achievement. Surprised We can't provide anywhere near our own needs from our allotment yet, although it's very early days, only 1 year in. I just hope we get enough time to come closer to meeting some of our own needs before TSHTF. Although, I look on the allotment as a practice run, because if things really went pear shaped the looters would head straight to the allotments and strip them bare. Rolling Eyes
_________________
Set The Fire To The Third Bar

http://www.srtt.co.uk/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PowerSwitch Forum Index -> Preparations All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group